Friday, 20 February 2015

Part 1 - Functions & Benefits of TRACE Minerals Required by the Body for Good Health

Minerals work in unison with other nutrients to help maintain efficient bodily functions for good health.  See my article “What are Minerals and How do they Help with the Body’s Health Explained” for a quick overview.

Minerals can be divided into 2 groups, as follows:

·         The 7 main minerals required by the body in moderate amounts
·         Trace minerals required by the body in smaller amounts


In this article we’re going to look at the TRACE minerals required by the body to see what their role is in helping to maintain good health, their functions and benefits, together with each mineral’s natural sources plus adverse conditions from excesses or deficiencies.

The main TRACE minerals include:

·         Chromium
·         Cobalt
·         Copper
·         Fluorine
·         Iodine
·         Iron
·         Manganese
·         Selenium
·         Zinc


Let’s take a look at each of these minerals in detail:


Chromium

Functions:  Chromium is necessary for the synthesis of GTF (glucose tolerance factor) which is needed for the metabolism of glucose.  It helps to transport proteins to where they are needed around the body.  It also aids growth and helps to prevent high blood pressure.
               
Natural sources of chromium include:  meat, liver, chicken, cheese, yeast, and whole grains.

Excesses of chromium could result in:  no known toxicity.

Deficiencies of chromium could result in:  contributory factor to diabetes; arteriosclerosis (degenerative changes in the arteries leading to decreased elasticity of the arteries).


Cobalt

Functions:  Cobalt is a constituent of Vitamin B12 and is needed for formation of red blood cells.

Natural sources of cobalt include:  meat, liver, kidney, poultry, fish, eggs, milk, and cheese.

Excesses of cobalt could result in:  no known toxicity.

Deficiencies of cobalt could result in:  anaemia.


Copper

Functions:  Copper helps iron in the formation of haemoglobin.  It also helps in the utilisation of vitamin C.  Copper is needed for the manufacture of melanin (dark pigment of the hair and skin) and myelin (sheath formed around nerve fibres).

Natural sources of copper include: peas, beans, whole wheat, liver, and seafood.

Excesses of copper could result in:  rare.  Abnormal storage could result in Wilson’s disease.

Deficiencies of copper could result in:  anaemia.


Fluorine

Functions:  Fluorine is a constituent of natural calcium fluoride and synthetic compound sodium fluoride.  It is important for tooth structure, and therefore could help to prevent dental decay.  It also helps to strengthen bones.

Natural sources of fluorine include:  fluoridated drinking water, and seafoods.

Excesses of fluorine could result in:  discoloured teeth;

Deficiencies of fluorine could result in:  tooth decay; possibly contribute to osteoporosis (gradual decrease in the rate of bone formation, leading to softening of the bones).



CONTINUED IN PART 2:



See also:

>>Click here for Part 1 of the Functions and Benefits of the 7 Main Minerals Required bythe Body in Moderate Amounts for Good Health  to see the functions and benefits of calcium, chlorine, and magnesium.


>>Click here for Part 2 of the Functions and Benefits of the 7 Main Minerals Required bythe Body in Moderate Amounts for Good Health  to see the functions and benefits of phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and sulphur.



N.B.  It’s important to observe your doctor’s or health care professional’s advise with regard to daily recommended allowances for vitamin and mineral intake to ensure you intake the correct amount, as excesses or deficiencies of vitamins and minerals could result in adverse effects.


Prices/discounts indicated correct at time of writing/publishing.  E&OE.





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